Yet more TRW book recommendations

Posted by kacates on October 21, 2010


Just Listen by Sarah Dessen 

When Annabel, the youngest of three beautiful sisters, has a bitter falling out with her best friend Sophie, she suddenly finds herself isolated and friendless. But then she meets Owen—a loner, passionate about music and his weekly radio show, and always determined to tell the truth. And when they develop a friendship, Annabel is not only introduced to new music but is encouraged to listen to her own inner voice. with Owen's help, can Annabel find the courage to speak out about what exactly happened the night her friendship with Sophie came to a screeching halt?

Heavy Metal and You by Chris Krovatin 

Boy listens to lots of loud music and hangs with his friends. Boy meets girl. Boy falls dippy-happy-scared-as-hell in love with girl. Friends meet girl – and aren't impressed. Girl meets friends – and isn't impressed. Boy meets big dilemma. Boy plays music even louder. Big dilemma meets big, complicated resolution.

Knuckle Sandwich by Adam Palmer 

Bass player Jeremiah Springfield was born to rock. The son of a musician, Jeremiah was raised on a steady diet of his father's classic seventies rock albums. When Jeremiah meets enigmatic singer/songwriter Matt Ripke and Liz Bennett, a beautiful and talented drummer, it's a match made in Christian rock heaven. Soon the group is tearing up the youth group scene and making quite the name for themselves. But when they move from the small towns to a national tour, they learn quickly that fame isn't everything. This is the break the band has been hoping for, but can they survive life in the spotlight with all its temptation and distraction?

When the Black Girl Sings by Bil Wright
 

Lahni Schuler is the only black student at her private prep school. She's also the adopted child of two loving, but white, parents who are on the road to divorce.  When Lahni and her mother attend a local church one Sunday, Lahni hears an amazing gospel choir, and her life takes an unexpected turn. It so happens that one of Lahni's teachers, Mr. Faringhelli, has nominated her for a talent competition, and she is expected to perform a song in front of the whole school. Lahni decides to join the church choir to help her become a better singer. But what starts out as a way to practice singing becomes a place of belonging and a means for Lahni to discover her own identity.

Posted in Music, Reading suggestions

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